Identify the significant relationships this person has to other people, organizations and activities by asking the person to identify the quality of the relationships

ASSIGNMENTS WILL NEED TO CORRELATE (BE BASED OFF OF THE SAME CASE). PLEASE MAKE EACH ASSIGNMENT RELATE TO ONE ANOTHER, BOTH ASSIGNMENTS HAVE TO RELATE. THESE ARE TWO SEPARATE ASSIGNMENTS BUT THEY BOTH NEED TO RELATE! PLEASE READ BELOW FOR THOROUGH INSTRUCTIONS

Eco-Map – 15%
Each student will assess a case of their choice through the use of an eco-map. A written case description should accompany the eco-map to explain any graphics, legends, or pictures. A brief history should also be attached. An outline of this assignment is attached to this syllabus and will be discussed in class. This paper should be typewritten, double-spaced, legible, stapled and between 3-4 pages. Information for the Eco-Map can come from previous cases or cases that are developed through Intake and Individual Counseling role plays conducted during the class. Names of real people should be changed for confidentiality purposes. Use of interviewing, active listening, consultation with others, and observation of clients can be helpful in developing your demographic information.

The Eco-Map Assignment
An Eco-Map is a visual depiction of a person in their life space and the negative stressors and positive energy they experience in that environment. Back in 1974 when the study of ecological systems was becoming popular, Dr. Ann Hartman, a social worker, used the concept of an ecological system and applied it to humans and their communities. She saw the dynamic interplay between the human and their environment as a complex system of interrelated parts, much the same way that other systems theorists saw biological or organic systems interconnected. She created a diagram or mapping system to demonstrate this visual relationship, which she called an Eco-Map. This map is a kind of social “solar system”, in which a family Genogram is placed in the position of the sun in the middle of a circle, and other people and institutions are placed within circles around the center, like planets around the sun. This type of visual work of Hartman’s was considered to be a type of Systems Theory, which was being used in other sciences at the time. Practitioners still use this model today since as a visual tool it helps clients see the strengths and stressors in their life, which can affirm for them their feelings of depression, anxiety, or even pride at the strengths they have developed.
Go to the following websites to find a blank template that you can use.
http://www.routledgesw.com/files/ecomap-template.pdf
You can look at more examples on this website:
http://socialwork.msu.edu/koehler/docs/Ecomap%20Activity.pdf
THE ECOMAP
The EcoMap is a simple visual assessment tool used to highlight relationships among people. For instance, a child, their family and their social network can be depicted through an Eco-Map. Human Services Practitioners and clients can map out together the key connections between the child, the family and their ecological environment. Identifying theses links clarifies information about family dynamics, the strength of relationships, and access to or absence of available resources.
The EcoMap uses standard symbols to express how the person connects with the elements in their life – family, people, organizations, activities etc. For example, a solid line may indicate a strong and healthy relationship, while a broken line represents a weaker tie. Arrows can be added at the end of each line to indicate reciprocity of some relationships while stressful or adverse relationships are represented by a dotted line crossed by several hashed lines.
Using the EcoMap the practitioner can work directly with the child/family in an effort to better identify those relationships that are strong and resilient and those that may be characterised by risk and adversity.
As a simple visual tool, the EcoMap can helpfully support the analysis and understandings of family relationships and improve the child’s/young person’s understanding of the wider circumstances. Practitioners should:
· Place the person of focus – child/young person, parents/carers or family – at the center of the circle
· Identify the significant relationships this person has to other people, organizations and activities by asking the person to identify the quality of the relationships
· Using the key below (or ones provided or discussed in class), draw connecting lines that identify the character of connections/relationships between the person of focus at the center and the other people, organizations, and activities that are noted around them.

Need Someone to Write Your paper ✍️
We can Help